What is Heart Shock?

“Heart Shock refers to a systemic instability, and to some degree, chaos, resulting from life insults or traumas (…) Not all shocks are created equal. Some are more significant than others, and individual constitutions vary considerably, creating the need to weigh all the variables as we interpret our findings”. 

In this extract from Heart Shock, Ross Rosen explains how physical and emotional trauma can affect the body, and how an understanding of ‘heart shocks’ can improve treatment with Chinese Medicine.

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Endometriosis and Chinese Medicine

Chinese Medical Gynaecology offers a holistic and level-headed Chinese medicine approach to common problems in women’s health, and the book offers women the opportunity to take control of their health by providing recipes for self-treatment, along with other treatment options.

Endometriosis is a common condition in women that can have a significant impact on women’s lives. Eddie Dowd, in this extract, examines endometriosis from a Chinese Medicine perspective, discusses dietary considerations and provides therapeutic recipes for women who have endometriosis.

Click here to read the extract

Read more about the book, or buy a copy here.

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Treating Emotional Trauma with Chinese Medicine

CT Holman, M.S., L.Ac. discusses what motivated him to write, Treating Emotional Trauma with Chinese Medicine: Integrated Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies.

“Having experienced emotional trauma as a child and as a young adult, I was motivated to delve deeply into the nature of spirit. Beginning with practicing meditation and then going to graduate school for Chinese medicine, the nature of balancing emotions intrigued me and inspired me to further study with several prominent teachers in the field of Chinese medicine and shamanism.

My teachers’ insights provided me with several tools to stabilize patients after they had experienced an emotional trauma. Once their energy was grounded, I could use techniques to soothe the triggering of the trauma memory and address their individual emotional/spirit imbalances. Through working with several patients to resolve emotional trauma, I discovered effective methods to transform trauma and enable the patient to step into their full potential.

After treating patients for emotional trauma for 15 years, I was asked to write a book,  Treating Emotional Trauma with Chinese Medicine: Integrated Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies, detailing the various treatments and self-care methods I utilize in my clinic. The undertaking was a healing one for me and supported me to step more fully into my being.”

In the below video CT describes the etiology and three-staged treatment approach that is described in detail in his above textbook:

CT Holman teaches Chinese Medicine (including facial diagnosis, qigong, shamanic drumming and channel palpation) internationally and operates a thriving general family Chinese medicine clinic in Salem, Oregon, USA. For more information, visit www.redwoodspring.com.

Acupuncture Without Needles?

I have spent a lot of time developing my technique with an acupuncture needle. First as a practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and then as a teacher of needle technique, and now as the author of The Living Needle, a book on the subject. I have a lot of friends who aren’t acupuncturists that ask me if there is anything in all that work for them, other than just getting treatments from me. The answer is a resounding yes! While the needle is certainly the most well-known tool of the TCM practitioner and a very useful one as well, it is not the most important thing at my disposal, or even completely necessary to my trade.

As I discuss in The Living Needle, what is most important is that the body is engaged, and not simply engaged in a passive way, but really meaningfully engaged. This can be accomplished with or without a needle. While it is wonderful to be able to make direct contact with the deeper tissues, the fact that is so often forgotten by providers and patients alike is that all the body’s tissues are interconnected into one vast network. This means that contact with any tissue will necessarily affect all the others. Because of this, as any good massage therapist knows fingers can be just as powerful as needles. This reality is perfectly clear not only in massage, but in trigger point therapy and any number of other manual techniques using nothing more than a finger or an external tool to create pressure.

Am I suggesting that you don’t need to see an acupuncturist? Not necessarily because there is a wealth of diagnostic and other skills we bring to the table, I’m just suggesting you might not be stuck waiting on your appointment to start seeing benefits. You don’t even have to go to a massage or physical therapist to start reaping some rewards (though in a lot of cases you should go see them too). What I’m suggesting more than anything, is that your health and well-being are your business first and there are some simple tools and tricks close to hand that you can start using right now!

All around your house are implements that you can bring to bear on your aches, pains, and even internal medicine issues; from the handle of a spoon, to a toothpick, or a rolling pin, almost anything can be used to apply targeted pressure to the body. And of course you always have fingers. Here are a couple specific things that you can try.

  • Digestive Rolling: Get a round implement, a dough roller, stiff cardboard tube, or even the side of a pencil. Find the front edge of your shin bone just under your knee. Place the tool just below the knee and about half an inch outside the edge of your shin bone. It shouldn’t be pressing on the bone, but it should be pretty close. From here, with strong pressure (it shouldn’t be painful, but you should know you’re doing it) roll whatever you’re using down the front of your leg to your ankle. Come back to the start and do it again. Roll down nine times and then do the other leg. This area of the body has a strong effect on the digestion and rolling it like this will bolster stomach function and up-regulate peristalsis. This is a big deal, because with the chronic stress most of us live under our digestive system is underfunctioning most of the time, and chronic underfunction in the digestive system can lead to all sorts of long term illnesses!
  • Morning Wake-Up Call: Get that same item you used to roll your shin and put it on the floor. You’re going to sit down and put your foot on it so that the inside edge of your foot, just behind your big toe is pressing against it. Put some pressure on it and roll it back and forth from just behind the big toe to the heel, keeping the pressure focused mostly on the inside edge of the foot. This will again stimulate digestive function, but will also help with adrenal function and cortisol, which can help you feel brighter eyed on those draggy mornings!
  • Stress Buster: Feeling stressed? Especially that kind of stress where it feels like someone is squeezing the middle of your chest and refuses to let go? Grab the handle of a spoon or a toothpick if you like a little bit of a sharper sensation, or even just use your finger if you don’t have anything else close to hand. On the underside of your wrist, find the two tendons that run down from your hand. About an inch and a half below the crease of your wrist you’ll find a little tender spot between those two tendons. Press and hold there, making little counter-clockwise circles. On the top of your foot, between the bones behind the big and second toe, slide back toward the top of your foot until you feel where those bones almost meet and then move back toward your toes just a little. You should find another tender spot there where you can repeat the same procedure. While you’re rubbing either of these spots try to slow your breathing down and take nice long breaths. Within a minute or two you should feel a lot better!

The most important thing to remember with any of this is that the real treatment, the fundamental improvement isn’t about the tool that you use, it’s about the meaningful engagement with the body. Most of us live a life where we are largely separated from our bodies as far as awareness goes. The adage I often share with students and patients alike is that most of us don’t know we have feet until we stub our toe. So while you’re doing any of these practices, really get involved. Don’t simply poke away at the body while you make a mental grocery list of other things you have to do. Be aware of the sensations you feel under your fingers and in your tissues. After all, it’s your body, you might as well get to know it!

This more than anything is the real art to medicine, the ability to actively connect with a body and respond to it in the moment. This is also where real health lives. If you want to learn more about engaging the body feel free to pick up The Living Needle: Modern Acupuncture Technique.

 

Justin Phillips, LAc teaches needle technique and advanced needle technique at AOMA. He also runs a private acupuncture practice in Texas. His new book, The Living Needle: Modern Acupuncture Technique explains the fundamental principles of the art of needle technique for acupuncturists.

Using Chinese Medicine in Women’s Health

Eddie Dowd, author of Chinese Medical Gynaecology, has written an article for us on how ancient medicine can complement modern biomedicine to improve outcomes in women’s health.

In this article, Dowd details how Chinese Medicine can be used in conditions relating to female and reproductive health to alleviate symptoms and treat the person as a whole. Chinese Medicine has been used to treat female patients for centuries, and the popularity of such treatments has never been higher.

With proven success in increasing fertility, reducing menopause symptoms and improving women’s overall health, Chinese Medicine is a low-tech solution that utilises simple remedies with a very low risk of side effects, such as nutritional remedies, which are easy for women to employ in self-treatment, empowering them to take control of their health.

Read the article here

Chinese Medical Gynaecology, a new release from December, offers a holistic and level-headed Chinese medicine approach to common problems in women’s health, with accompanying recipes for treatment that can be used in practice or at home.

Read more about the book here

 

 

If you would like to read more articles like this and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

‘The Spirit of the Organs’: Extract

John Hamwee’s The Spirit of the Organs contains 12 stories each depicting a different organ of the body and illustrates how they are traditionally understood in Chinese Medicine. Hamwee explores the spirit of each organ not in analytical, rational, summarising language but through life stories that express the nature and tendencies of the organ at a deep level.

We have an extract from the book which explains why a practitioner’s appreciation of the spirit of an organ can lead to more effective treatments with patients. You can read the extract here.

Click here to read more about the book.

If you would like to read more articles like this and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.


More books by John Hamwee

Intuitive Acupuncture

An incisive and wide-ranging exploration of the role of intuition in the effective treatment of patients through acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The author explores theory, clinical experience, and best ways to develop reliable intuition through rigorous interrogation and self reflection.

Click here to read more about the book.

Zero Balancing

The classic, definitive book on Zero Balancing, an increasingly popular therapy that can be easily practised alongside other complementary therapies. Descriptions of particular sessions and client experiences are accompanied by a wider discussion about the nature and behaviour of energy and its use in healing.

Click here to read more about the book.

Acupuncture for New Practitioners

An invaluable guide for anyone beginning a career in acupuncture, this book offers insights into likely challenges and pitfalls of the first years of practice. It addresses styles of working, common mistakes, confidence with patients, and success and failure in the treatment room, helping novice acupuncturists to reflect on their practice.

Click here to read more about the book.

 

Essential Resources for Chinese Medicine Students

We have all the books you need for your Chinese Medicine course, from comprehensive textbooks to fun and engaging learning tools such as our acupuncture colouring book and a comic covering the diagnosis of 78 syndromes of Chinese Medicine.

Read more about our books for students below. To view all the books in our Books for Students collection, please click here.

Basics of Chinese Medicine

Principles of Chinese Medicine by Angela Hicks is a a definitive introductory guide to Chinese medicine, and is a great starting point for those just beginning their studies. You can read more about the basics of Chinese Medicine, including an examination of yin and yang in this extract from the book.

 

Principles of Chinese Herbal Medicine by John Hicks is an authoritative introduction to the fundamentals of Chinese herbal medicine. We have an extract from the book here, which details the characteristics, processing and properties of the herbs used in Chinese Medicine.

The Yellow Monkey Emperor’s Classic of Chinese Medicine is a truly unique learning tool. With this graphic novel, you can learn and remember the syndromes of Chinese medicine, their causes, symptoms and treatment protocols with these witty cartoons, rich with Daoist in-jokes. We asked Spencer Hill for a glimpse ‘behind the scenes’ of working on the book, and in this blog piece, Hill recalls the process of drawing the cartoons for The Yellow Monkey Emperor’s Classic of Chinese Medicine and how he met and came to work with Damo Mitchell.

Also of interest

Acupuncture

The Fundmentals of Acupuncture by Nigel Ching is a fantastically readable guide to Chinese Medicine, and you can read more about acupuncture points, and yuan source points in particular, in the extract here.

 

 

Rainy Hutchinson’s The Acupuncture Points Functions Colouring Book presents a fun and practical way of learning the functions of acupuncture points on the twelve primary and eight extra channels. This colouring book is an essential learning resource for students of acupuncture, acupressure, shiatsu and massage, and is ideal for revision and self or paired testing. We have an exclusive colouring page from the book here.

 

Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine by Charles Buck is an authoritative and accessible account of the history of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The book provides an accurate overview, focussing on the key developments that are of most practical relevance to the students and clinicians of today. In an extract from the book, you can read about medicine in China prior to the Han Dynasty.

Chinese Medicine – Techniques

Nigel Ching’s The Art and Practice of Diagnosis in Chinese Medicine is a complete diagnostic manual for students of Chinese medicine. It covers how to collect and collate the relevant information needed to make a diagnosis and clearly describes the various diagnostic models in Chinese medicine.

We have an extract from the book which includes a detailed discussion of interviewing techniques, including suggestions on what questions to ask your patients.

 

Clare Stephenson’s The Acupuncturist’s Guide to Conventional Medicine is a comparative textbook which provides everything students and practitioners of complementary medicine need to know about conventional medicine. You can read a sample from the book on the processes of disease, examined from both a conventional medicine perspective and a Chinese medicine perspective here.

We also sat down with Clare Stephenson to talk about Eastern and Western medicine, acupuncture and complementary therapies in practice. Read the interview on our blog.

Classical Chinese Texts

Grasping the Donkey’s Tail by Peter Eckman is an in-depth examination of some difficult, often misunderstood classical texts of Oriental medicine, and is an essential text for students of Chinese Medicine. You can read about the Yi Jing in this extract from the book.

 

Richard Bertschinger’s Essential Texts in Chinese Medicine is a commentary and translation of the key writings for students and practitioners of Chinese medicine in the 21st century from the ancient, definitive set of books on Chinese medicine, the Huangdi Neijing or ‘the Yellow Emperor’s Medical Classic’. You can read an extract from the book here.

 

 

If you would like to read more articles like this and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Reflecting on a Lifetime’s Practice of Five Element Acupuncture

Nora Franglen’s latest book, Blogging a Five Element Life, shows the holistic nature of life as an acupuncturist, and is a must read for anyone interested in acupuncture or Chinese medicine.

We have an extract from the book, which features advice on treating patients effectively, guidance on acupuncture techniques and her thoughts on the elements and how they can be applied to public figures.

Click here to read the extract

Click here to read more about Blogging a Five Element Life.

If you would like to read more articles like this and hear the latest news and offers on our books, why not join our mailing list? We can send information by email or post as you prefer, and please also tell us about your areas of interest so we can send the most relevant information. You can unsubscribe at any time.


Books By Nora Franglen

Blogging a Five Element Life

The follow-up to Nora Franglen’s first book of collected posts on the holistic life of an acupuncturist, this provides further insight into the everyday musings of a master of her craft. From her love of London’s cafes to challenges she has experienced in her clinic, it reveals how acupuncture can enrich and balance all aspects of our being.

Read more about the book here.

 

On Being a Five Element Acupuncturist

Based on her well-read blog, Nora Franglen provides a rich insight into the inner thoughts and feelings of a master acupuncturist. Covering everything from her love of coffee shops to how to treat patients effectively, it is reveals the holistic and rich nature of acupuncture.

Read more about the book here.

 

The Handbook of Five Element Practice

A companion for practitioners of Five Element acupuncture that strengthens the foundation for practice. With detailed outlines of the different components of Five Element diagnosis and treatment, this complete manual will support and invigorate practice. It also includes a Teach Yourself Manual.

Read more about the book here.

 

The Simple Guide to Five Element Acupuncture

This accessible guide explains the history and philosophy of five element acupuncture, and shows how it addresses specific health needs and general well-being. With case studies throughout, the guide explains how an acupuncturist diagnoses and treats patients, and looks at the character of each element.

Read more about the book here.

 

Keepers of the Soul

With profiles of well-known figures, the book explains the spirit of each of the Five Elements of Chinese medicine, and what they look like in different people. The philosophy behind Five Element acupuncture is explained, including what it means to live in harmony and how the Five Elements help shape our body and soul.

Read more about the book here.

 

Patterns of Practice

Considering acupuncture in its wider context, this book contains Nora Franglen’s reflections on her practice and explores how the search for acupuncture points can lead the practitioner deep into challenging areas of existence.

Read more about the book here.

 

What is Five Element Acupuncture?

by Nora Franglen

You can see from the title of my six books published by Singing Dragon that I practise and write about a branch of acupuncture called five element acupuncture. All acupuncture is based upon an understanding of an ancient Chinese philosophical concept which describes the universe and all who live in it as created by the Dao, the All, the infinite, what we can think of as the universe before the Big Bang.

 

The Dao itself is divided into two forces called yin and yang, positive and negative forces created at the time of the Big Bang, which always counterbalance each other and make time and motion possible. Finally, yin and yang split into what the Chinese call the five elements, each with simple, everyday names of Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water. In geographical terms we can see the elements as being like the four directions of north, south, east and west, with the fifth its centre.

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