Donna Noble: Body Positivity – Head to our Instagram Now!

 

Donna Noble has been practising yoga since 1999. She is the creator of CurveSomeYoga. She has been a certified yoga specialist since 2011 with the Yoga Alliance and British Wheel of Yoga. She is also a certified NLP Master Practitioner. As well as teaching in New York and Texas she teaches all over the UK, and also taught at the Om Show, runs workshops and yoga retreats. She hosts her own show “The Noble Art of Wellbeing” on Natural Health Radio as well as being a fitness writer and blogger. She is on a mission to make yoga more accessible and diverse.

Donna is currently working on a book for Singing Dragon about making yoga classes body positive, due to be published in 2021.

CLICK HERE TO JOIN THE LIVE CHAT NOW

James Foulkes: Yoga Therapy and Lifestyle Medicine

 

James Foulkes is a yoga teacher and IAYT Registered Yoga Therapist. Originally from England, James has trained for 15 years with the students of Vanda Scaravelli.

His book, Principles and Themes in Yoga Therapy was released by Singing Dragon in 2017.

At present, James operates a busy Yoga Therapy Practice, and has taught on numerous Yoga Therapy trainings and Yoga Teacher trainings. He conducts classes and workshops around the Washington DC Area, around the United States and internationally.

In this video James discusses yoga therapy and lifestyle medicine, touch, complex illness as well as using yoga therapy to support those who have been incarcerated.

 


Principles and Themes in Yoga Therapy
An Introduction to Integrative Mind/Body Yoga Therapeutics
James Foulkes, Foreword by Mikhail Kogan, MD, illustrated by Simon Barkworth

Provides a brief history of yoga therapy before offering a new way to think about anatomy and the wholeness of the human being. Through case studies, the author explores different principles of practice with tips for yoga therapy practitioners to develop their working client relationship and their own conditioning. Read more

Max Strom: Is Yoga a Women’s World?

 

Born with severe clubbed feet, Max Strom spent much of the first six years of his life with his feet confined in plaster casts and braces. Today, he is known for inspiring and impacting the lives of people from all walks of life, teaching breathing patterns and personal transformation worldwide. His method, Inner Axis, is known to produce immediate results in alleviating stress, anxiety, burnout, and depression, impacting the internal and emotional aspects of our life, as well as physical healing. His TEDx talk, Breathe to Heal, is approaching one million views on Youtube. Many know him for his two inspiring books: There is No APP for Happiness, addressing the challenge of finding meaning in the digital age, and A Life Worth Breathing.

In this video, Max discusses men in yoga: why they might feel excluded, the importance of connecting with emotions, and the benefits for men in joining the yoga community.

 

Andrew McGonigle: 5 Reasons Why Lotus Might Not be for You

 Have you ever wondered why certain yoga postures can feel so easeful in your body while others can feel like such a challenge?

Or why one person can sit cross-legged for hours having never practiced yoga and you still need to sit on four cushions after practicing yoga for years?

The short answer to this is that every body is entirely unique and will express a certain yoga pose in a completely unique way. There are also emotional, psychological and nervous system components that affect how much movement our joints make and the quality of that movement.

Let’s explore some of these factors using our hip joints as an example. Continue reading

Jess Glenny: Finding My Body’s Voice

Supportive Teaching for People with Developmental Trauma in the Yoga Class

This article is adapted from The Yoga Teacher Mentor: A Reflective Guide to Holding Spaces, Maintaining Boundaries, and Creating Inclusive Classes, which will be published by Singing Dragon in January 2019.

Developmental trauma (also known as complex trauma) is more common than is generally assumed and often undisclosed at yoga classes, even where it’s asked about on student intake forms. Most often, you will gradually become aware of the signs of developmental trauma through observing how your student is (or isn’t) in their body, the kinds of connection they are able to make and sustain with you as teacher, and how they relate to the group at large.

Developmental trauma generally begins very early in life, sometimes before birth and often prior to the development of language and cognitive thought, and is a response to childhood experiences such as neglect, abandonment, and/or physical or sexual abuse. The severity of the consequent trauma response depends to a large extent upon whether any trustworthy and caring adult – teacher, grandparent, older sibling, foster-parent – was available to the child. Recovery is generally much harder for those with whom no one formed a genuine, altruistic and nurturing bond.

Successfully resolving developmental trauma is a slow and challenging process, but it is possible, given appropriate forms of therapy (these are different from the types of therapy useful for working with PTSD or one-off trauma). Without therapeutic intervention, the effects of developmental trauma usually persevere into adulthood, profoundly affecting the person’s physical and mental well-being, cognition, capacity for meaningful relationship, and ability to live in and from their present-moment embodied experience. Continue reading

Welcome to our Virtual Yoga Summit!

Welcome to Singing Dragon’s first-ever Virtual Yoga Summit, a digital event celebrating inclusivity in yoga and yoga therapy with the help of a carefully curated panel of experts and authors. This blog will be the central hub to our event, so do keep checking back to access all content, including videos, articles and podcasts. For scheduled live events, please head over to the Singing Dragon Facebook page.

Click the cover below to browse the full programme, meet our contributors and read about our partners’ work.


 

Our Virtual Yoga Summit live events are as follows:

9th October
11.00am UK/ 6.00am ET – Lisa Sanfilippo & Charlotte Watts & Lisa Kaley-Isley: How to Teach Yoga Therapeutically – Discussing Yoga and Yoga Therapy. Live-streamed event at Yogacampus Finsbury Park

16.00pm UK/11.00am ET – Donna Noble on Body positivity and inclusion. A live chat through the Singing Dragon Instagram

17.00pm UK/12.00 ET – Heather Mason: Yoga in Health Care. Facebook live

18.00pm UK/13.00 ET – Robin Rothenberg: Breath and chronic conditions. Facebook live

20.00 UK/15.00 ET – Shawnee Thornton Hardy: Making yoga and mindfulness inclusive and accessible to children and adults of diverse abilities. Facebook live

 

10th October
16.00pm UK/11.00 ET – Charlotta Martinus: Yoga for emotional intelligence among teens – a research perspective. Facebook live

17.30pm UK/12.30 ET – Sian O’Neill: An inclusive live class. Facebook live

19.00pm UK/14.00 ET – Aggie Stewart: Teaching Inclusive Group Yoga Classes for People with Chronic Conditions. Facebook live

All live events are interactive, so please do come with questions – our presenters will be happy to answer them!

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The Complete Yoga Anatomy Coloring Book: Gluteus Maximus

Illustrated with anatomical drawings for coloring throughout, The Complete Yoga Anatomy Coloring Book by Katie Lynch covers physiology of the breath; movements of the joints; workings of the spine, shoulders and pelvis and in-depth muscle information before moving onto Asana Anatomy specifically related to the main standing, seated and inversion postures.

We are happy to share with you our first excerpt from the book, covering the gluteus maximus, the largest muscle of the “glutes group” and the primary muscle for hip extension.

Continue reading

International Day of Yoga: A Reading List for Students and Teachers

International Day of Yoga takes place across the globe on the 21st of June 2019. Many yoga teachers and studios will be offering free classes and events to help raise awareness worldwide of the benefits of practicing yoga. To celebrate, we have collated a reading list to support students and teachers in their practice, as well as those looking to incorporate yoga into their day-to-day lives.

Did we miss anything? What topics would you like to see on our lists? Let us know in the comments below!

The Complete Yoga Anatomy Coloring Book
Katie Lynch

This practical and engaging coloring book helps yoga teachers and students develop their knowledge of the human body. Featuring 100+ illustrations and backed by rigorous scientific knowledge, it is the ultimate tool for all those interested in practising yoga effectively and safely. Learn more

Continue reading

Meet The Singing Dragon Author: Karla Helbert

As part of our Meet The Singing Dragon Author series, we speak to authors to discuss their motivation for entering their respective industries, inspiration for writing their books, what challenges they faced and who they would recommend their books to. Is there a specific Singing Dragon author you would like to hear from? Let us know in the comments or join the conversation using #MeetTheSDAuthor.

Karla Helbert, author of The Chakras in Grief and Trauma: A Tantric Guide to Energetic Wholeness

How did you become interested in yoga therapy and aromatherapy?
I became interested in aromatherapy in the early 90’s and have studied it ever since. I have long been drawn to essential oils for therapeutic, emotional and spiritual uses. I began taking yoga classes around 1999 and after a year, decided to take a teacher training and it was life changing. It brought together all the aspects of spiritual life that I had been seeking for years, one that addresses humans as whole beings—physically, emotionally, energetically, spiritually. As a psychotherapist, I was able to bring the principles and teachings of yoga into my practice with clients and can see the effectiveness not only of asana (poses), meditation and breathwork, but also how the philosophy and ethical underpinnings of yoga support and create change. The essential teaching of yoga is wholeness and that our true nature is and has always been whole, that we can be no other way. Life, pain, grief, heartbreak, challenges, cause us to forget our essential wholeness, but all the teachings and branches of yoga remind us of this truth. Continue reading